Have you ever considered the impact gender has on your career trajectory in science?

Complete our survey and share your views on gender equality in science

Go to the profile of Hannah Coaker
Feb 01, 2016
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With only ~11% of women holding senior positions in scientific academia across the EU, the issue of gender inequality in STEM continues to attract much debate globally. A 2015 study conducted by L'Oréal Foundation, which investigated the public’s perceptions of scientists, suggested that this disparity may be a result of prejudices systemic in our society. The survey indicated that 67% of Europeans were of the opinion that women do not possess the required capabilities needed to access high-level scientific positions, while in China, 93% were of the belief that women lacked the abilities to pursue senior science jobs.In spite of this, over half of survey’s respondents felt that the evolution of women’s place in scientific research is shockingly slow and many estimated that women were far more numerous in science than is actually the case – so what is the cause for the apparent lack of gender equality in science?

In view of International Women's Day (8th March, 2016), we will be holding a panel discussion in which senior members of the scientific community will be asked to share their thoughts on potential contributing factors to the underrepresentation of women in science. Ahead of this, we are asking members of the STEM community to complete our survey which aims to canvass the opinions of those pursuing a career in these fields. The survey results will be published in a striking infographic and discussed in a live panel discussion with our experts on International Women’s Day.

We would love to know your thoughts on the underrepresentation of women in STEM. Have you personally felt hindered or at an advantage in your pursuit of a career in science as a result of your gender? Tell us your opinions on systems aimed at promoting equal opportunities to both men and women in science, and which factors you feel are largely responsible for impeding the rise of women to senior-level science positions. Have your say and take part in our survey here



Go to the profile of Hannah Coaker

Hannah Coaker

Contributor, Future Science Group

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