Gerald Lushington

Dr., LiS Consulting

About Gerald Lushington

Gerald Lushington has a passion for the collaborative aspects of drug design, with his greatest interests lying in the application of molecular modeling, chemical informatics and bioinformatics to problems of direct interest to molecular biology, synthetic chemistry, and chemical biology. Among the various facets of pharmacology he has made significant contributions to are genetic target validati...

Gerald Lushington has a passion for the collaborative aspects of drug design, with his greatest interests lying in the application of molecular modeling, chemical informatics and bioinformatics to problems of direct interest to molecular biology, synthetic chemistry, and chemical biology. Among the various facets of pharmacology he has made significant contributions to are genetic target validation, structural biology, chemical library optimization, molecular diversity analysis, structure-based drug design, QSAR and toxicology. In addition to his consulting activities, Lushington has adjunct faculty appointments as professor of Human Nutrition at Kansas State University, and within the Medicinal Chemistry Department at the University of Kansas. He has more than 150 peer-reviewed publications, of which at least one hundred relate fairly closely to drug discovery challenges. He serves the broader community in his role as informatics section editor for the journal Combinatorial Chemistry and High Throughput Screening, and as an informatics editor in the online reviewing service WebMed Central. Among the various journals Lushington serves in editorial advisory board capacities include BMC's Journal of Clinical Bioinformatics, Bentham's Current Bioactive Compounds, and Jacobs Journal of Drug Metabolism and Toxicology. Although Lushington collaborates with a diverse array of academic and corporate clients and partners, his most active areas of research relate to the development of microbiology therapeutics, including de novo discovery of viral protease inhibitors and in the commercialization of antimicrobial peptides.

The Latest in "Hands On" Software

Several years ago, the old 'molecular modeling software' industry collapsed due to competition from free, open-source, and frequently superior tools. The new paradigm is bringing us exciting improvements in functionality and diversity, provided one knows how to use it. The only thing I miss is the 'sandbox' interface tool just just plain old hacking around with molecules. Are there any new free tools emerging to take the place of old Behemoths like SYBYL and Discovery Studio?
Go to the profile of Gerald Lushington
Apr 17, 2015